More Testing Ahead for "Not Totally Conclusive" Goal-Line Technology

(ATR) FIFA President Sepp Blatter says that there may be goal line technology in place in time for the 2014 World Cup Finals in Brazil. James Corbett reports from Celtic Manor in Wales.

(ATR) FIFA President Sepp Blatter says that there may be goal line technology in place in time for the 2014 World Cup Finals in Brazil as its lawmaking body agrees to a one-year extension in experiments in goal line technology.

A meeting of the International Football Association Board (IFAB) at Celtic Manor in Wales over the weekend heard that none of the ten companies who put forward technology proposals for testing last month met the criteria put forward by IFAB last year.

But FIFA agreed that testing should continue for a further twelve months and goal line technology is likely to be on the agenda when IFAB holds its annual meeting in London next year.

"On goal-line technology, we will go on with the technical experiments and then to bring back this item to the IFAB meeting next year in London, and then a final decision will be taken," Blatter said.

"If it works definitely, the board will say yes to the technology. And if the board says yes, then there is a no problem, then there should be no problem to have it in 2014.

"[But] I have to restrict my natural optimism and come a little bit back because the tests we have had so far are not conclusive."

Results in tests carried out in February, Blatter said, "were not totally conclusive" but three companies have "a good chance of progressing with the experiment." Blatter named Hawkeye and Cairos, but declined to mention the third company.

He said that IFAB were unanimous in their support for goal line technology and "there was not any voice going against it."

"What is one year?" he asked, when questioned about the pace of change. "It’s nothing, just a little patience."

For more from Celtic Manor, visit World Football Insider.

Written by James Corbett.