Australia will be hosting a third Summer Olympics as Brisbane wins the bid to stage them in 2032

The Queensland capital succeeds Melbourne 1956 and Sydney 2000 as Olympic host city. The Games will be held from July 23 to August 8, 2032.

A view of the Southbank forecourt, a potential venue for archery for the 2032 Olympic Games bid for Brisbane, in Brisbane, Australia, June 29, 2021. Picture taken June 29, 2021.  REUTERS/Jaimi Joy
A view of the Southbank forecourt, a potential venue for archery for the 2032 Olympic Games bid for Brisbane, in Brisbane, Australia, June 29, 2021. Picture taken June 29, 2021. REUTERS/Jaimi Joy

TOKYO - Australia will be hosting a third Summer Olympics, something that only a few countries can boast of, as Brisbane and Queensland will join Melbourne in 1956 and Sydney in 2000 in hosting the Games.

The IOC members voted in favor of the candidature at the end of the second day of the 138th IOC Session in Tokyo on Wednesday.

Brisbane and Queensland will follow Melbourne in 1956 and Sydney in 2000 in hosting the Games, which will be held between July 23rd and August 8th 2032. Exactly the same dates on which the Tokyo 2020 Games, which open this Friday, will be held.

The Brisbane delegation present in Japan, which included the Premier of the State of Queensland as well as the Mayor of the city, celebrated in Tokyo. A giant screen at the IOC session venue showed Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison clenching his fist and smiling broadly in Australia, moments after the IOC president, Thomas Bach, confirmed the city as the host city, following a vote by IOC members.

There has been little doubt for months that the 2032 Olympics were headed Down Under.

The IOC had designated Brisbane in February as the preferred candidate to host the Games under a new method of selecting Olympic host cities. Cities interested in hosting the Games now engage in an extended series of consultations with a permanent commission that recommends a single candidate for final consideration.

The new process eliminates costly international campaigning as well as production of complicated bid books, among other changes to simplify how the IOC selects a host city. Coincidentally, Australian Olympic Committee president John Coates was the chair of the IOC working group that developed this new way to bid for the Games.

After Brisbane was designated as the IOC favorite in February, the state and federal governments agreed in late April to a 50/50 split of infrastructure costs. That agreement was considered the last significant hurdle for the Queensland bid.

The delegation that made Brisbane’s final presentation to the IOC members emphasized that their proposal, “downsizes the budget, but maximizes the Olympic experience”.

The decision for Queensland comes 11 years before the Games, well ahead of the past IOC timetable that would select a host city seven years before.

Brisbane’s bid leaders spoke about the future Olympic city “as a rising star in the southern Hemisphere”, and expressed their hopes that their success will be followed “by mid sized cities around the world carrying the message”.

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