U.S. Consumer Borrowing Rose in November by Most in Five Months

An U.S. flag is seen on a 2014 Ford Motor Co. F-150 truck displayed for sale at the Oxmoor Ford car dealership in Louisville, Kentucky, U.S., on Wednesday, Feb. 25, 2015. Domestic and total vehicle sales figures are scheduled to be released on March 3. Photographer: Luke Sharrett/Bloomberg
An U.S. flag is seen on a 2014 Ford Motor Co. F-150 truck displayed for sale at the Oxmoor Ford car dealership in Louisville, Kentucky, U.S., on Wednesday, Feb. 25, 2015. Domestic and total vehicle sales figures are scheduled to be released on March 3. Photographer: Luke Sharrett/Bloomberg

(Bloomberg) -- U.S. consumer borrowing increased in November by the most in five months on a jump in non-revolving credit such as loans for motor vehicle purchases.

Total credit climbed $15.3 billion from the prior month after a downwardly revised $4.5 billion October gain, Federal Reserve figures showed Friday. The November figure topped all economists’ estimates in a Bloomberg survey whose median projection was for a $9 billion increase.

Non-revolving debt, which includes auto and school loans, rose $16.1 billion, also the most since June. Lending by the federal government, which is mainly for student loans, increased about $600 million before seasonal adjustment.