Supreme Court Halts Mail Delivery of Abortion-Inducing Pills

The U.S. Supreme Court in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Monday, Dec. 7, 2020. Bipartisan negotiators on a $908 billion pandemic relief package are planning to unveil more details of their proposal on Monday, aiming to settle on language that can satisfy enough Republicans and Democrats to secure passage of one final tranche of Covid-19 aid before Congress breaks for the year. Photographer: Al Drago/Bloomberg
The U.S. Supreme Court in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Monday, Dec. 7, 2020. Bipartisan negotiators on a $908 billion pandemic relief package are planning to unveil more details of their proposal on Monday, aiming to settle on language that can satisfy enough Republicans and Democrats to secure passage of one final tranche of Covid-19 aid before Congress breaks for the year. Photographer: Al Drago/Bloomberg

(Bloomberg) -- A divided U.S. Supreme Court reinstated a requirement that women visit a medical facility to obtain abortion-inducing pills, granting a Trump administration request to end the mail deliveries a judge had allowed during the pandemic.

The order marks a shift for a court that let mail deliveries continue temporarily in October. That was before Justice Amy Coney Barrett joined the court and strengthened its conservative majority.

The court’s three liberals said they would have let mail deliveries continue.